The UK (or at least England) education system and that state of society 19 replies

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The Joelteon7

The cake is a lie.There is no cake.

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13th November 2004

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#1 12 years ago

Ok, so in 3 weeks time, I'll be sitting the first of a month's worse of GCSE exams that will be my spring board to adulthood, mostly jubs and higher education. I've been doing some external research though by asking family and generally, anyone I know that is older then me. To those who are in the UK and older then me, can you honestly say you have applied quadratic expressions into real life? These same people, have you problems doing your taxes? Whilst, this isn't meant in a derrogatory way, I can't help thinking that what I'm leaving school with won't actually benefit me with that much for maintaing a life. For example - Did anybody here learn, say in a maths lesson, how to do taxes, mortgages etc. money balancing so you worked out your overall income after outgoings? Same people again but, would you have found it helpful if you had? How about the fact that the english language in England is actually degrading every year! Whilst slang and general language development (which takes place all the time) I obviously except, the new "text languge" is somewhat frustrating and I beleive possibly to lead onto the future. To what extent, well, take this as an example: In my english class, on my table there are four people including myself, diagonally opposite a friend (also intelligent) and two other people. The girl opposite me rarely speaks and the person next to me, well, to be fair, isn't the brightest person in the world. Anyhow, as you do with curiousity, I looked through one of his exam papers completed in the winter - I counted several spelling mistakes in one paragraph and decided not to go on. You're probably thinking, so what about those two? My gripe is that, in english lessons, you should be taught to be confident in your words (as to speak up, unlike this girl) and you should be told to construct basic sentence structures that don't include text language (seen from that essay). The overall point I put forward is that with more and more money being thrown into the education system, is it ACTUALLY being used to achieve the desired effects and could teachers perhaps take the initiative into their own hands and teach what really needs to be? Perhaps a general change of the national curriculum t include things actually required for later life?




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#2 12 years ago

Let's put it this way, I'm taking my A Levels and I don't even know what a quadraticthingumybob is beyond being used in maths. I did at one point - but it's completely useless and I haven't used it in the three years since I knew what it was. A large part of English language is simply not taught anymore either, whichever bright spark decided not to teach grammar deserves their ears washing out with a .50 cal. Most of that which is taught now under the guise of English language is actually English literature, which is simply telling you how to analyse things - the majority of which is bullshit anyway. School does not exist to give you a decent education, school exists to train you to pass tests. If you want an education you have to go out and get it yourself, which is as it should be, the strong and smart being in a superior position to the weak and stupid.




The Joelteon7

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#3 12 years ago

I would agree with you on the idea that all we are taught, say in English, is literature. In the two GCSE years, we have mostly studied texts and picked up a few words along the way (only a few months ago did I learn the meaning of a hypoerbole). Also, it seems as if general speaking is going out the window too. Whilst you can still make sense of what people say, the level of which it is spoken can be quite worrying. For example: Hyperbole, phoenetically spoken is - Hi-per-bow-lee whereas it took quite some time for people to not say it as - Hi-per-bowl. These are the basic things that I beleive should be taught. Phoenetics really isn't that complicated and yet the only reason why I know how to do it is because my parents taught me.




Nostradamouse

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5th December 2004

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#4 12 years ago

Hyper"bowl" is actually the french pronounciation.




The Joelteon7

The cake is a lie.There is no cake.

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13th November 2004

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#5 12 years ago
NostradamouseHyper"bowl" is actually the french pronounciation.

That's fine, but I'm talking about in the UK. I respect though that pronounciations are different all over the world. A good exmaple of this is the difference in pronounciation between American and English English.




Mast3rofPuppets VIP Member

08'aIgnorance is not an excuse

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28th November 2003

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#6 12 years ago

I must say that I learned rather much of things that are good to know in real life during my education (T minus 1 month and 16 days until graduation). Some examples:

How to make a budget. How to calculate how much you would have to pay per month if you bought an apartment (you got to chose your own one from the newspapers and calculate on it). How to cook (ah the memories, those lessons kicked ass, but if I learned to cook is another question :p) and how to make a grocery list that would give you enough food for a few weeks.

Ofcourse there was alot of bullshit too but that's school for you.




The Joelteon7

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#7 12 years ago
Mast3rofPuppetsI must say that I learned rather much of things that are good to know in real life during my education (T minus 1 month and 16 days until graduation). Some examples: How to make a budget. How to calculate how much you would have to pay per month if you bought an apartment (you got to chose your own one from the newspapers and calculate on it). How to cook (ah the memories, those lessons kicked ass, but if I learned to cook is another question :p) and how to make a grocery list that would give you enough food for a few weeks. Ofcourse there was alot of bullshit too but that's school for you.

I'm presuming this is in Sweeden though? In which case, that seem's to be on-line with what I'm thinking of what should be happening over here - general life "maintanence", so to speak.




Force Recon

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10th July 2004

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#8 12 years ago

I got my O levels within a year.That's not the problem.Its the Pure Maths test we will be having on Tuesday(25th April) for which I need more time and practice.Jesus,I hate that subject.

To those who are in the UK and older then me, can you honestly say you have applied quadratic expressions into real life?

I am not sure but some people I know said its required if you want to study Computer Science.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#9 12 years ago

By the time you're taking GCSEs you should have a line on what you want to do so those who need it for computer science could take a course specialising in maths with an aim for computer sciences. Since I've taken my maths GCSE the only bits of maths I've needed have been averages, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division - this did not require more than seven years worth of training and wasted time.




Huffardo

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29th November 2003

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#10 12 years ago
Joelteon7To those who are in the UK and older then me, can you honestly say you have applied quadratic expressions into real life? These same people, have you problems doing your taxes? Whilst, this isn't meant in a derrogatory way, I can't help thinking that what I'm leaving school with won't actually benefit me with that much for maintaing a life.[/QUOTE] Well, I'm not from the UK, but I don't think I have used quadratic expressions too much IRL, i.e. outside school and university. Still I am rather sure I will need them more later, but most probably won't. Anyway, quadratic expressions are so simple that they are almost boring, it can't be that hard to learn them, can it? Now university engineering maths is somewhat more challenging, although nothing compared to the more advanced stuff, but I don't like maths much enough to major in it... :) [QUOTE=Joelteon7]For example - Did anybody here learn, say in a maths lesson, how to do taxes, mortgages etc. money balancing so you worked out your overall income after outgoings? Same people again but, would you have found it helpful if you had?

We had a bit of those, but not much, and then again, basic calculation like that are really simple if you have learned some maths, it's just the tax instructions and rules that are horrible, plus remembering everything.

Maths FTW. :p




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