The Universe 37 replies

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RadioactiveLobster Forum Admin

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#1 12 years ago

If there is one thing out there, the is so mind boggling amazing, its the universe.

I was watching some sci-fi shows, and it got me thinking. Not about aliens or other life forms, but more specifically on the different mechanics of the universe.

Thinks like black holes, supernovas, and other phenomena.

Just attempt to think about it. The space between planets is huge, between stars is bigger, between galexies is inimaginably huge. What is there, nothing?

What about the theories of places in the universe, between galexies where the gravitational pull from the gallexies cancels eachother out, and space itself tears apart.

Your thoughts?


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uberhen

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#2 12 years ago

I always think about how far things are apart in space- you could travel for trillions of miles, and not even see any planet up close. Plus, there's got to be some kind of life form out there in space besides us. There's definately enough room for some.




Faceless32

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#3 12 years ago

The immense distant between us and Mars is enormous, taking years upon years to reach with a discovery -like spaceship. Then the distance between Our solar sytem and the next makes me wonder if space travel if really possible, I mean no imformation can travel faster than the speed of light, and that means we can't , Unless you turned cosmonaughts into pure energy, but I don't see how you could turn one back. It makes me feel rather alone in the universe.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#4 12 years ago

Haha, you think one universe is big, it gets worse.

There are mulitple universes out there floating in a 11-dimensional hyperspace. This is according to string theory though, but imagine the size of that hyperverse. Infinities galore.

uberhenI always think about how far things are apart in space- you could travel for trillions of miles, and not even see any planet up close. Plus, there's got to be some kind of life form out there in space besides us. There's definately enough room for some.[/QUOTE]

Well, according to astronomers, things are getting farther apart at an increasing rate of speed. So, this universe is getting larger every second.

[QUOTE=Faceless32]The immense distant between us and Mars is enormous, taking years upon years to reach with a discovery -like spaceship. Then the distance between Our solar sytem and the next makes me wonder if space travel if really possible, I mean no imformation can travel faster than the speed of light, and that means we can't , Unless you turned cosmonaughts into pure energy, but I don't see how you could turn one back. It makes me feel rather alone in the universe.

I think the trip would take 6 or 8 months one way with a conventional rocket if I recall correctly. It's really not that bad.

Still a long time to be in space, though.

Scientists are trying to find faster spacecraft, though. We have pesky relativity in the way (light speed limit), but there may be ways of getting around that.




Free

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#5 12 years ago

We live on Earth. Universe is someone else' s business. Stars are there to remember to mind your own. No mystical theory, just a memo.




Tango Protocol

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#6 12 years ago
FederikerWe live on Earth. Universe is someone else' s business. Stars are there to remember to mind your own. No mystical theory, just a memo.

That is a very close minded view. We live on earth, which is in a galary, which is in the universe.

my ultimate question.. where do things that get sucked into a blackhole go? ;)




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#7 12 years ago
Knippschild ...my ultimate question.. where do things that get sucked into a blackhole go? ;)

Nowhere. A black hole isn't a hole. It's an infinitely-dense point in space (like a point mass). Everything that falls into a black hole gets torn to pieces and falls on that point mass. I'd tell you the details about how mass increases affect black holes but I'd have to pull out my Astrophysics book (if I can find it), but what I said answers your question.




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#8 12 years ago
Killer KyleNowhere. A black hole isn't a hole. It's an infinitely-dense point in space (like a point mass). Everything that falls into a black hole gets torn to pieces and falls on that point mass.

Theoretically of course. We can't really know for certain most of these different things until we physically test them.

There are two theories for the destruction of the universe that I have heard about. One is called the "Big Crunch" and the idea is that as the universe expands gravitaional forces will get so weak that anti-gravity forces coming from dark matter(which makes up something like 90% of the universe, it is the stuff inbetween galaxies and such) will collapse the universe in on itself. I'm just going on memory though, I'll check back later when I find the magazine.

The second theory is the "Big Freeze" and this theory is that the universe will expand infinetly until it gets to the point where the entire universe is so far apart, each atom is seperated byhuge distances, that it reaches absolute zero and all movement is halted entirely, in the entire universe.




Tango Protocol

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#9 12 years ago

Watch this. black holes are really holes that pull you into a different dimension. :p




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#10 12 years ago

AfterburnerTheoretically of course. We can't really know for certain most of these different things until we physically test them.

There are two theories for the destruction of the universe that I have heard about. One is called the "Big Crunch" and the idea is that as the universe expands gravitaional forces will get so weak that anti-gravity forces coming from dark matter(which makes up somethin glike 90% of the universe, it is the stuff inbetween galaxies and such) will collapse the universe in on itself. I'm just going on memory though, I'll check back later when I find the magazine.

The second theory is the "Big Freeze" and this theory is that the universe will expand infinetly until it gets to the point where the entire universe is so far apart, each atom is seperated byhuge distances, that it reaches absolute zero and all movement is halted entirely, in the entire universe.

Well, the first one depends on if we are in a closed universe or not, and astronomers have found that, even with dark matter and dark energy, we are merely in a flat universe (between open (expands forever) and closed (eventually does a "Big Crunch"). Flat and open universes expand forever but can or are supposed to slow down but never completely stop. Scientists have found the opposite, though. They have evidence that shows that the universal expansion rate is increasing, which means that some long-distance repelling force may exist (either that, or something else).

I never heard of the second theory but it seems flawed because temperature does not depend on atomic distances. Plus, unless all of the atoms in the universe become Bosons, some of the matter will have energy even at absolute zero (though that does not mean things will still move). Thermodynamics does predict that the entire universe will degrade to heat energy though, which is the least useful form of energy. This is thanks to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that the change entropy (a measure of disorder) of a system is always greater than or equal to 0. Thus, things can only become more disorderly. If the universe runs out of useful energy, it will pull it from matter somehow or cease to work, and if it manages to convert all matter into energy, it will degrade to heat, creating a universe of maximum disorderliness.

As for your first statement, that is true. What we cannot test, we measure or find evidence to support our theories, and if things match up, we say it's a good theory and it works until it is refined or something better comes along.

Scientists do like to create these environments so they can measure and test these things, and they can come up with some exotic environment these days.