Timelord Science 24 replies

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Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#1 10 years ago

Ok, so the title quote is from a Doctor Who episode, I'm not expecting everyone to remember which one, nor do I expect everyone to watch Doctor Who. The quote just seemed relevant to title this thread. Anyway, I don't care when you were born, or how old you are now. Everyone who has access to these forums should have at least heard about Doctor Who, the Daleks, the Cybermen and the Tardis, etc. The Tardis is the Doctors 'Space Ship' - granted it sure doesn't look like it. Anyway, as everyone should know, it is bigger on the inside, than it is on the outside. It isn't just Doctor Who that we've had such shown, I know we have had at least one scene in Star Trek: Enterprise with a small shuttle pod that was in fact larger in the inside. I'm sure there are many other sci-fi shows and movies that have similar situations. Anyway, based on common theories, science, predictions and what not that we have these days, do you guys think that the future would / could hold this for us? To think, we could one day buy a car, drive around, and then instead of parking it up, we could put it in our pocket.




Tas

Serious business brigade

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4th September 2004

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#2 10 years ago

I have no idea if this will ever be possible. For someone to say "this will or will not happen" when talking about the distant future however he or she would have to be pretty ignorant.

I don't think it will be used in the way you described though, i wouldn't want to be a first responder to a scene where a "folded" Ford F150 malfunctioned and "unfolded" while the owner was in the bathroom.




Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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#3 10 years ago
Tas;4792517I have no idea if this will ever be possible. For someone to say "this will or will not happen" when talking about the distant future however he or she would have to be pretty ignorant.[/quote]True, but I was looking at it more from a scientific angle. I mean, could it be possible to bend space and time to allow for such? [quote=Tas;4792517]I don't think it will be used in the way you described though, i wouldn't want to be a first responder to a scene where a "folded" Ford F150 malfunctioned and "unfolded" while the owner was in the bathroom.

Obviously there would be saftey features installed. :nodding:




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#4 10 years ago

There's very little science to be found in Doctor Who; it's pure fantasy, and that's what the appeal is for most of its viewers I suppose.




Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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#5 10 years ago
Mr. Matt;4792537There's very little science to be found in Doctor Who; it's pure fantasy, and that's what the appeal is for most of its viewers I suppose.

Yes, I know Doctor Who is Fantasy, but it isn't just Doctor Who that has put this in play. Various other sci-fi shows have items of discussion going for them. Faster than Light Speed, Energy based Weapons, Cloaking Technology, Transporter Technology. Why not the ability to have something bigger on the inside? I'm not expecting people to come back with exactly how this could be acomplished (obviously nobody knows). I'm just interested in any theories that anyone may have had on it in the past, and suchlike.




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#6 10 years ago

As far as I know this would be quite impossible, in the strictest sense. Matter doesn't care about "inside" vs "outside" so it's not like the interior of an object could magically expand past the material it is made of.

You could, however, possibly create some sort of storage system where there was a massive storage facility built someplace, and when you push an object through a given opening it is transported to this other place, though this would require the same technology that a transporter would, which is debatable if it's physically possible. Plus, technically the inside of the object wouldn't be bigger, it would be two separate objects.

The only other possibility I could think of would be compressing the objects to astronomically small proportions, though any living thing would likely be killed doing that.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#7 10 years ago
Captain Ash;4792548Yes, I know Doctor Who is Fantasy, but it isn't just Doctor Who that has put this in play. Various other sci-fi shows have items of discussion going for them. Faster than Light Speed, Energy based Weapons, Cloaking Technology, Transporter Technology. Why not the ability to have something bigger on the inside? I'm not expecting people to come back with exactly how this could be acomplished (obviously nobody knows). I'm just interested in any theories that anyone may have had on it in the past, and suchlike.

Most technologies employed by science fiction are plot devices for entertainment and story purposes. Star Trek, for example, wouldn't be particularly interesting if they used xenon ion engines to accelerate their ships to other stars over a period of centuries, now would it? Some of these technologies are more plausible than others - energy weapons, for example, are a reality at the moment - but many more of them simply violate every currently known law of physics.

As for fitting a large room into a small box ala TARDIS, that would be one of the less plausible examples of science fantasy. You've got two options that I can think of:

  1. The TARDIS contains an elevator leading down into a large, underground cavern. Not quite the effect you were going for, and it wouldn't fly or anything, but it would at least be possible.
  2. The TARDIS is actually a portal to some kind of alternate dimension, so that it appears as though it holds a much larger space than it actually does. Why you would keep such a portal in a police call box, I don't know, but I once found a chocolate bar in my computer case so stranger things have happened.

None of us are about to rewrite the laws of nature to make this possible, as I don't think we're qualified to do that.




Mr. Pedantic

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#8 10 years ago

Yes. Technically I would think it is possible. Fourth-dimensional objects such as Klein bottles technically have an infinite amount of 3-dimensional space within them, just as a box has an infinite amount of 2-dimensional planes in it. If you could somehow build such a containment facility, then technically you could fit the whole universe within it.

As for actual physical containers and stuff existing only in 3 dimensions, I doubt it.




Rich19

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14th August 2004

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#9 10 years ago

Captain Ash;4792484Anyway, based on common theories, science, predictions and what not that we have these days, do you guys think that the future would / could hold this for us? To think, we could one day buy a car, drive around, and then instead of parking it up, we could put it in our pocket.[/quote]

Captain Ash;4792548Various other sci-fi shows have items of discussion going for them. Faster than Light Speed, Energy based Weapons, Cloaking Technology, Transporter Technology. Why not the ability to have something bigger on the inside?

What, precisely, is so difficult about the concept of fiction? Why, if there is a choice between believing the laws of physics and believing the pretty pictures on the TV screen do so many people take the TV option? Of course we have no way of making things bigger on the inside using "common theories and science". The same thing applies to faster than light travel and transporter technology. I for one am going to side with Mr Einstein over Mr Roddenberry, thank you very much.

(I'm leaving out energy weapons and cloaking technology from the above, because these are perfectly possible.)

[quote=Mr. Matt;4792575]Most technologies employed by science fiction are plot devices for entertainment and story purposes. Star Trek, for example, wouldn't be particularly interesting if they used xenon ion engines to accelerate their ships to other stars over a period of centuries, now would it? Some of these technologies are more plausible than others - energy weapons, for example, are a reality at the moment - but many more of them simply violate every currently known law of physics.

As for fitting a large room into a small box ala TARDIS, that would be one of the less plausible examples of science fantasy. You've got two options that I can think of:

  1. The TARDIS contains an elevator leading down into a large, underground cavern. Not quite the effect you were going for, and it wouldn't fly or anything, but it would at least be possible.
  2. The TARDIS is actually a portal to some kind of alternate dimension, so that it appears as though it holds a much larger space than it actually does. Why you would keep such a portal in a police call box, I don't know, but I once found a chocolate bar in my computer case so stranger things have happened.
None of us are about to rewrite the laws of nature to make this possible, as I don't think we're qualified to do that.

100% agreement.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#10 10 years ago

All this talk of 4d space and so on is just crap until someone comes up with an experiment to verify it.

"Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality." - Nikola Tesla

For myself I don't think we'll ever see such a thing, not on scientific grounds but upon pragmatic ones - when we could construct it what would be the point in doing so? Even today we could probably make ourselves look like gods to some of the more primitive tribes on earth, (well I know we can we've done it by accident before,) but there's not a lot of point to it. Likewise the ability to compress and expand space or time implies a level of technology frighteningly in advance of our own; why would you use it to make things smaller unless you needed extra room - and why would you need extra room given a level of technology that would almost undoubtedly imply abilities so far in advance of our own?