Turkey's EU-membership 41 replies

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Relander

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8th April 2005

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#1 12 years ago

Turkey has caused a lot of controversy in the European Union by its possible membership and not only the politicians, but also the people have divided into two camps: one camp says yes for Turkey's membership and the other camp says no. Turkey has, for some parts, common history, culture and values with other Europe and small landslide of the country belongs to Europe geographicly.

Is Turkey's EU-membership a threat or opportunity for Europe? Where we should draw the line in picking new memberstates into the EU?

P.S. If you don't have any other to say than how much the EU sucks, don't bother.




Komrad_B

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2nd September 2004

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#2 12 years ago

I don't think Turkey should join the EU. I have heard a number of stories about recent human rights violations in this country (torture, violation of free speech, suppression of minorities). The continued occupation of Cyprus is also worrying. I don't think this country is a healthy and stable democracy, and thus I don't think it should be allowed to join until they sort their problems out (which will take more than a few promises and and a couple of years).




GOD111

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1st July 2004

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#3 12 years ago

No, I don't think they belong in the EU for number of reasons. First, and perhaps the most important thing is that its only a very tiny part of Turkey that actually lies in Europe. The European Union is a union for European countries, not a country who's location more or less is in Asia. Then there are human rights and lack of democracy that Turkey over and over and over again show that they have problems with. The huge corruption that plagues the country is also a big factor, and this applys to European countries aswell that wants to join sucj as those in the Balkans etc. Then there is the culture. The EU countries have one thing that connects them in one way or another and that is a similar culture. Need less to say, Turkey has culture, but that culture has no similarities with the European countries culture what so ever. This of course has to do with the fact that they are Muslims. They might not be hardcore Muslims, but they are Muslims, and that is a given to create conflict. EU will lose all credibility if they accept Turkey in to the EU, IMO.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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7th December 2003

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#4 12 years ago

Accepting Turkey into the EU could make diplomacy with muslim nations a lot easier in the future, but they'll have to meet the standards if they want to join.




Huffardo

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29th November 2003

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#5 12 years ago

Well, I will be for it when they are ready and want to, but not now.

The line for choosing new members should in my opinion be put at the geographical boundaries of Europe, I don't think we should let the union become too big and powerful. The world domination disorder is pretty passé anyway.




Karst

I chose an eternity of this

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6th January 2005

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#6 12 years ago

I think having Turkey in the EU would be a huge diplomatic advantage, as they would provide a connection to the middle east, and i think it would also help modernize the country and reduce poverty (as it has with Ireland, Greece, Spain, Portugal and it surely will with all the new members).

But i also think Turkey is not ready yet. Although the standards of living are similar to Poland or some other easern european countries, a lot needs to be done in the human rights section and the judical system in general.

Also, the conflict over Cyprus would need to be resolved.




Relander

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#7 12 years ago
*SW3D3*The huge corruption that plagues the country is also a big factor

I haven't heard or read anywhere that the expansion commissar Olli Rehn or rest of EU commission for that matter have criticized Turkey for corruption. Please correct me with sources if I'm wrong.

Then there is the culture. The EU countries have one thing that connects them in one way or another and that is a similar culture. Need less to say, Turkey has culture, but that culture has no similarities with the European countries culture what so ever.

That's not honest to say, there are similarities. Even with its flaws, Turkey is a democratic country with multi-party system, free market economy and they enjoy from music, television, dancing, eating and partying just like us, even though they are muslims. Many cultural influxes have passed through Turkey to Europe from Middle East long time ago and Turkey partially shares the same history with EU. In the past, the cooperation have been very active between Turkey and European countries, especially with Germany and its increasing from day to day.

I support Turkey's membership but ONLY if it meets the demands given by the European Union. Human rights violations must stop, freedom of speech executed 100 %, issue with Cyprus solved, military's political power decreased into the minimum and the economic growth must remain at high level. Like MrFancypants and Karst have said, accepting Turkey as new member would greatly help the diplomacy between EU & muslim countries, increase the mutual understanding, disperse suspicions from both sides and give valuable economic link to the Middle East.

After Turkey and Croatia have been accepted as EU-members, the membership door should be closed. The decision-making of EU would be paralyzed with too many member states and we would get drowned even more on bureaucracy. We would have to make too many compromises and the power of individual countries would be reduced too much. We simply can't include whole Europe into EU without difficult, expensive reforms.




Fire Legion

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11th March 2006

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#8 12 years ago

This is a topic I've been debating a lot with friends recently. No way should they join yet. They are a backward nation, who show little urgency to comply with basic rules. They lack free-speech and employ often brutal measures in punishments and military actions. They illegally occupy half of Cyprus, and refuse to open tjheir doors to Cypriot planes and ships. Indeed, I would go so far as to say that they belong more with the Middle Eastern crowd, than with Europe. It will be at least 20 years before Turkey can begin to join. If they solve the innumerable flaws and injustices in their society and policy, then they will deserve to join. This will take time, as their energies in complying with EU demands have been unconvincing.




emonkies

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17th July 2003

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#9 12 years ago

I agree with Relander, Turkey should be allowed in but only when it meets the EU standards.

I voted no only because I dont think Turkey should be allowed in at this time, maybe later when they have improved.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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16th April 2005

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#10 12 years ago

I don't think Turkey should be allowed in. Closer relations with Turkey sure, but not inclusion with the EU.

The effect (most of it destabilising) will only bring down Europe, despite Turkey's strengthening economy, millions of Turks will flood into Europe, which, as we have seen with the "Polish plumber" effect, will greatly increase right-wing tensions and hatred inside the EU. There are already these issues developed in France, Sweden and Germany, and probably Holland as well (feel free to correct me), which are seeing the rise of strong anti-groups (neo-nazis winning some elections in Germany, etc).

Including the EU will extend the EU border to touch Iraq, Syria, Iran, and the Caucasus states. This may bring diplomatic/economic benefits, but it also presents a lot of risk.

Ultimately, there should be an EU-wide referendum on Turkey, not just left to the MEPs or other politicians.