USA: 2012 Republican Primaries - South Carolina 10 replies

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Commissar MercZ

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#1 6 years ago

Time for another installment children!

South Carolina has brought out many interesting things. Aside from the usual flavor of primaries (I'm more conservative than you, he's closet liberal, appeals to evangelicals) it has also demonstrated the interesting flavor of 'populism' especially in regards to criticisms of Romney's business background and earnings. In other contexts this would usually be seen as 'class warfare' or insulting towards our principles, but here, it is fair game. It also goes into the weird with criticism regarding Romney's knowledge of French.

Another interesting aspect, while we are on the topic of income, has been candidates releasing their tax returns. Gingrich has released his tax return in order to put pressure on Romney to do so in order to challenge him to show that he isn't 'beyond' the Republican base.

Romney probably isn't too keen either on a leak of a file from the 2008 McCain campaign during the Republican primaries which has information and dirt on Romney. It would be gold to his opponents though- if any such 'juicy' info can be found to add to the already saturated airwaves of attack ads.

The other media fervor is around Newt Gingrich and his marital life. Gingrich has made much about his campaign as a way of 'redemption' to deflect attempts to smear his character on moral grounds. Gingrich has benefited in the polls mostly from more socially conservative voters looking for a strong alternative to Romney.

Rick Santorum is still hanging around. He might be bolstered though by news that after some recount and submissions from missing districts, that Santorum, not Romney, actually won Iowa. Wheterh this'll have an effect or not on Santorum's competition against Gingrich to secure the anti-Romney vote, I don't know. He certainly hasn't been able to fair well in that regard.

Ron Paul hasn't been able to garner the same degree of attention he did earlier, it seems. As Republican members attempt to find a strong candidate to rally around without showing signs of divisions, people like Paul are finding it harder to get their voice out. Like Santorum, he has been relying on making use of debate airtime and heavy campaigning in South Carolina.

As far as casualties go, we have two. The first was former Utah governor Jon Huntsman, an awkward entry into the primaries who had always seemed to have been unable to get his name out there, be it bad or good. Huntsman has decided to put his support in for Romney.

The other was Texas governor Rick Perry. Many people (as did I in an earlier thread) believed he would see the results of the South Carolina primary before deciding to drop out. He did it before the final vote after seeing that as far as opinion polling went, he was not producing strong numbers in a state that should otherwise feel at home to him. Too many gaffes and revealing glimpses of his low political acumen made him seem ill prepared next to his opponents. Perry urges his supporters to go for Newt Gingrich in order to put a strong, 'faith' friendly person on the Republican ticket.

Another interesting thing has been the use of Super PACs so far, a new form of political action committees arising from the decision of recent court cases, notably Citizens United, which set up the ground work for PACs with the ability to raise large amounts of money from donors without having to report them. Everyone from President Obama to the current Republican contenders in the primary have such organizations present. For his part Stephen Colbert, repeating his 2008 Primary run in South Carolina, also organized a Super PAC to demonstrate its flaws and a look into the state of campaign finance.




Commissar MercZ

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#2 6 years ago

With some 90% of stations reporting, South Carolina was won by Gingrich. With 508,102 votes, so far it shows:

Gingrich: 40%/ 21 delegates Romney: 27% Santorum: 17% Ron Paul: 13%

South Carolina carries a total of 25 delegates.




BITE_ME!!

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#3 6 years ago

Ya looks like Newt is giving Mit a good stomping there....




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#4 6 years ago

So it looks like they are down to Romney, the guy who earned tons of money by strip-mining companies in trouble and Gingrich, the guy has affairs with other women when his wives are disagnosed with a potentially lethal disease.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#5 6 years ago

That's ok, they're Republicans, and over here, a Republican is NEVER wrong.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



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#6 6 years ago

I don't know what happened, but I find myself supporting Gingrich for some reason; even though I despise the man because he's basically a walking crime against humanity.




Commissar MercZ

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#7 6 years ago

Looking at the summary of votes so far, I've found an interesting statistic if CNN has the correct figures. Check the link in the first post about the results. Anyways, it appears that from exit polling some 45% of voters landed in 45-64 and a further 27% over 64. 19% from 30-44, and 9% 18-29.

Granted, primaries usually have a different demographic attending since it is not a 'general' election, but still, more 'older' people participating than younger. That does fall in line with normal election turnouts where the older generation tends to be more committed to turn out and vote.

The full breakdown of exit polling is here. Note that its a limited pool of respondents, but I think it gives an idea of the general age group that the contenders are appealing to for votes. The ideology thing is interesting too, that some people would consider themselves "somewhat liberal" and vote break even between Romney or Gingritch- though open primaries like South Carolina's do see opposing party members attempt to sway the vote.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#8 6 years ago

So Gingrich wants to build a permanent base on the moon in the next 8 years and send 13000 Americans there so that they can petition for the moon to be the 51st state.

For reference, the ISS, which can permanently (if properly maintained) remain in low Earth orbit with a crew of 6 cost about 100 billion €.




Commissar MercZ

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#9 6 years ago
MrFancypants;5605641So Gingrich wants to build a permanent base on the moon in the next 8 years and send 13000 Americans there so that they can petition for the moon to be the 51st state.

I think Bush had gone on the same thing during his re-election bid in 2004, with the angle that a moon base could be used as a platform for exploration of other planets, or at least the first step to a manned mission to Mars. I think though he scrapped it by the time he got back into office.

I think McCain, who supports Romney, said to prospective primary voters to send Gingrich to the moon instead.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#10 6 years ago

From what I recall Obama also used the "I'll bring back NASA" promise at some point but then he cancelled the Constellation program instead, which was the most ambitious program in a while.

While Gingrich's plans are a bit unrealistic I'd like to see a president who invests more in space explortaion. Seems unlikely though given the debts that western nations have to deal with these days.

BTW, when I wrote that about Newt yesterday I didn't really know how to express my feelings toward the idea adequately. Fortunately someone from the NYT managed to put it quite well: "Gingrich is a virtual supernova of megalomaniacal madness."




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