Water supplies dwindling in Mesopotamia 14 replies

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Commissar MercZ

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#1 8 years ago

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/14/world/middleeast/14syria.html

AR RAQQAH, Syria The farmlands spreading north and east of this Euphrates River town were once the breadbasket of the region, a vast expanse of golden wheat fields and bucolic sheep herds.

Now, after four consecutive years of drought, this heartland of the Fertile Crescent — including much of neighboring Iraq — appears to be turning barren, climate scientists say. Ancient irrigation systems have collapsed, underground water sources have run dry and hundreds of villages have been abandoned as farmlands turn to cracked desert and grazing animals die off. Sandstorms have become far more common, and vast tent cities of dispossessed farmers and their families have risen up around the larger towns and cities of Syria and Iraq.

“I had 400 acres of wheat, and now it’s all desert,” said Ahmed Abdullah, 48, a farmer who is living in a ragged burlap and plastic tent here with his wife and 12 children alongside many other migrants. “We were forced to flee. Now we are at less than zero — no money, no job, no hope.”

The collapse of farmlands here — which is as much a matter of human mismanagement as of drought — has become a dire economic challenge and a rising security concern for the Syrian and Iraqi governments, which are growing far more dependent on other countries for food and water. Syria, which once prided itself on its self-sufficiency and even exported wheat, is now quietly importing it in ever larger amounts. The country’s total water resources dropped by half between 2002 and 2008, partly through waste and overuse, scientists and water engineers say.

For Syria, which is running out of oil reserves and struggling to draw foreign investment, the farming crisis is an added vulnerability in part because it is taking place in the area where its restive Kurdish minority is centered. Iraq, devastated by war, is now facing a water crisis in both the north and the south that may be unprecedented in its history. Both countries have complained about reduced flow on the Euphrates, thanks to massive upriver dam projects in Turkey that are likely to generate more tension as the water crisis worsens.

The four-year drought in Syria has pushed two million to three million people into extreme poverty, according to a survey completed here this month by the United Nations special rapporteur on the right to food, Olivier De Schutter. Herders in the country’s northeast have lost 85 percent of their livestock, and at least 1.3 million people have been affected, he reported.

An estimated 50,000 more families have migrated from rural areas this year, on top of the hundreds of thousands of people who fled in earlier years, Mr. De Schutter said. Syria, with a fast-growing population, has already strained to accommodate more than a million Iraqi refugees in the years since the 2003 invasion.

“It is ironic: this region is the origin of wheat and barley, and now it is among the biggest importers of these products,” said Rami Zurayk, a professor of agricultural and food science at the American University in Beirut who is writing a book on the farming crisis.

The drought has become a delicate subject for the Syrian government, which does not give foreign journalists official permission to write about it or grant access to officials in the Agriculture Ministry. On the road running south from Damascus, displaced farmers and herders can be seen living in tents, but the entrances are closely watched by Syrian security agents, who do not allow journalists in.

Droughts have always taken place here, but “the regional climate is changing in ways that are clearly observable,” said Jeannie Sowers, a professor at the University of New Hampshire who has written on Middle East climate issues. “Whether you call it human-induced climate change or not, much of the region is getting hotter and dryer, combined with more intense, erratic rainfall and flooding in some areas. You will have people migrating as a result, and governments are ill prepared.”

The Syrian government has begun to acknowledge the scale of the problem and has developed a national drought plan, though it has not yet been put in place, analysts say. Poor planning helped create the problem in the first place: Syria spent $15 billion on misguided irrigation projects between 1988 and 2000 with little result, said Elie Elhadj, a Syrian-born author who wrote his Ph.D. dissertation on the topic. Syria continues to grow cotton and wheat in areas that lack sufficient water — making them more vulnerable to drought — because the government views the ability to produce those crops as part of its identity and a bulwark against foreign dependence, analysts say.

Illegal water drills can be seen across Syria and Iraq, and underground water tables are dropping at a rate that is “really frightening,” said Mr. De Schutter, the United Nations expert. There are no reliable nationwide statistics, and some analysts and Western diplomats say they believe the Syrian government is not measuring them.

As in other countries across the Arab world, corruption and failed administration are often to blame. “A lot of powerful people don’t abide by the regulations, and nobody can tame them,” said Nabil Sukkar, a Damascus-based economic analyst.

In Ar Raqqah, many displaced farmers talk about wells running dry, and turning polluted.

“My uncle’s well used to be 70 meters deep, now it’s 130 meters and now the water became salty, so we closed it down,” said Khalaf Ayed Tajim, a stocky sheep herder and farmer who heads a local collective for displaced northerners. He left his native village 60 miles from here when half of his herd died off and his fields dried up, and now lives in a concrete bunker with his 17 children, two wives, and his mother.

In Iraq, 100,000 people had been displaced as of a year ago, according to a United Nations report. More than 70 percent of the ancient underground aqueducts have dried up and been abandoned in the past five years, the report said. Since then, the situation has only worsened.

“We saw whole villages buried in sand,” said Zaid al-Ali, an Iraqi-born lecturer at the Institut d’Études Politiques in Paris who returned in August from a survey of water and farm conditions in Kirkuk and Salahuddin Provinces, in northern Iraq. “Their situation is desperate.”

Southern Iraq has seen similar farming collapses, with reduced river flow from the Euphrates and the drying up of the once vast southern marshes.

Syrian officials say they expect to get help from water-rich Turkey, which has recently become a close ally after years of frosty relations. But it may be too late to save the abandoned villages of northern Syria and Iraq.

“At first, the migrations were temporary, but after three or four years, these people will not come back,” said Abdullah Yahia bin Tahir, the United Nations Food and Agriculture representative in Damascus.

“Back in the village, our houses are covered in dust; it’s as if they’d been destroyed,” said Mr. Tajim, the farmer who moved here two years ago. “We would love to go back, but how? There is no water, no electricity, nothing.”

Hwaida Saad contributed reporting.

Once seen as the origin of agricultural practices and given the title of the fertile crescent, the bulk of Mesopotamia that laid within Iraq and Syria have faced a long term drought and dwindling water underground reservoirs and the once mighty rivers of the Tigris and Euphrates no longer giving the water it once did.

Some decades of poor agricultural practices and a changing environment has caused water to become more and more scarce in areas where it once wasn't. The agricultural communities that had been around for generations in Iraq and Syria are now facing the prospect of destruction.

Coming out of the 1990s the governments in the area saw the problem approaching and tried to take steps, but these led to waste and over use on already falling water supplies, exacerbating the situation. Dust storms have begun to hit places where they haven't historically, and the deserts that were confined to the southwest of Iraq and the Arabian Peninsula have been growing steadily northwards to the farmlands.

This is compounded by political concerns as well. Iraq has been wrecked by conflict, and in turn Syria has ended up taking the increased amount of refugees from Iraq. The rivers of the Euphrates and Iraq are now being covered up by dams their sources in Turkey, with neither Iraq or Syria able to do anything about it. This is mainly due to Syria's political isolation in international affairs and Iraq being torn apart.

While some people may have the image of the Middle-East being a desolate desert, this is certainly not the case. But unfortunately if the trend continues the desert in the Middle-East will grow and swallow up the once cherished Fertile Crescent.




jackripped

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#2 8 years ago

Droughts suck ,we get them here in OZ , but not to that extreem, l guess its just bad luck because we cant really fix a drought at the drop of a hat.




Commissar MercZ

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#3 8 years ago
jackripped;5418991Droughts suck ,we get them here in OZ , but not to that extreem, l guess its just bad luck because we cant really fix a drought at the drop of a hat.

How are the underground reservoirs in Australia? Has the arid/dry zone in the center grown any?




jackripped

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#4 8 years ago

Depends where you are mate, there are some areas, big areas that have not had decent rain for 15 years here. In general australia is getting far less rainfall than it used too, and its comming in as intense flooding instead of being spread over months of soaking rain. The East coast is fine, but inland is pretty dry buddy.

But again, theres not much we can actually do about it.




Keyser_Soze

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#5 8 years ago

i'm under the impression that in australia, the only areas with rain are those coastal areas around the great dividing range and perth? i've travelled the east coast of australia and never saw any extensive dryness (a little in north queensland- almost dried up river beds etc.) given the flatness of australia, rain is virtually impossible in central australia, to my understanding.

would this drought in mesopotamia have been caused by the draining hussein did to the marshes at all? i was under the impression they were now recovering, but i guess they won't be now.




jackripped

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#6 8 years ago

The east coast is pretty much fine, its inland thats dry as. Perth is ok too, we still get the coastal showers. It does rain in central australia, but when it rains there it basically pours, torrential rain and floods. Australia is so large, you have to remember that one area can be flooded and 300klms up the road is in a 15 year drought. It is quite strange to drive from one to the other etc. l live in an pretty humid area and we get crap loads of rain here, go inland 4 hours directly west, and they get almost no rain every year. l live in mackay about half way up the QLD coast. Go to NSW and most of the inland state is dry as a bone for 95% of the year. Victoria gets pretty good rainfall. South australia get reasonable rainfall around its coast. Northern Territory gets bugger all rain except in summer humid floods.And the center dont get much at all. The drought really only effects where we farm. Like the US we have utterly enormus wheat, oat, and othe grain crops. In the traditional areas where we grow these crops, we are in a drought for many of these areas. Australia has one big advantage over most countries, we have the will, and the tech, to actually incorperate irrigation systems. They have been getting built in OZ now for a decade or so much more efficiently than the past.




Keyser_Soze

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#7 8 years ago
jackripped;5419021The east coast is pretty much fine, its inland thats dry as. Perth is ok too, we still get the coastal showers. It does rain in central australia, but when it rains there it basically pours, torrential rain and floods. Australia is so large, you have to remember that one area can be flooded and 300klms up the road is in a 15 year drought. It is quite strange to drive from one to the other etc. l live in an pretty humid area and we get crap loads of rain here, go inland 4 hours directly west, and they get almost no rain every year. l live in mackay about half way up the QLD coast. Go to NSW and most of the inland state is dry as a bone for 95% of the year. Victoria gets pretty good rainfall. South australia get reasonable rainfall around its coast. Northern Territory gets bugger all rain except in summer humid floods.And the center dont get much at all. The drought really only effects where we farm. Like the US we have utterly enormus wheat, oat, and othe grain crops. In the traditional areas where we grow these crops, we are in a drought for many of these areas. Australia has one big advantage over most countries, we have the will, and the tech, to actually incorperate irrigation systems. They have been getting built in OZ now for a decade or so much more efficiently than the past.

yeah, travelled from cairns to melbourne (and tasmania), passed through mackay on the way to Fraser Island, followed the coast, though, didn't see any of the outback. i was there may-june this year, so there were occasional storms, although nothing massive. still, by UK standards, it was pretty dry!




MoreGun89

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#8 8 years ago

It's just strange to think (on the topic of the fertile crescent) that the place where most agriculture began (particularly referring to wheat) would be the area effected. Well, I guess the world changes wherever you go, but I hope they at least have another few years before it all becomes desert.


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Keyser_Soze

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#9 8 years ago
MoreGun89;5419121It's just strange to think (on the topic of the fertile crescent) that the place where most agriculture began (particularly referring to wheat) would be the area effected. Well, I guess the world changes wherever you go, but I hope they at least have another few years before it all becomes desert.

a large reason for this is hussein. to fund industry and weaken the indigenous peoples of the marshlands, the water was drained, which has resulted in a decline of 90%. the actual marshlands are located in between the Euphrates and the Tigris, by all accounts, they should be very fertile, it's the fault of draining from humans. i heard they'd been recovering since 2003 but it seems that it isn't that easy.

it's exactly the same as the situation with the Aral Sea. The Virgin Lands campaign from Khrushchev in the 50s led to the Aral sea drying out due to tributaries being redirected to irrigate massive areas of land for cultivation. now, the aral sea is a wasteland, and a fraction of its original size, and still declining at a worrying rate.

while it is desertification, this desertification is entirely man-made. the world as we knew it 50 years ago wasn't able to support our needs, so people embarked on these foolish projects, and while initially they were massive successes, they are massive failures for nature. it's a terrible situation and as time goes on, i expect we'll only see more as our aquifers drain and disappear. there are too many people on the world for the earth's resources to sustainably support.




NiteStryker

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#10 8 years ago

The Fertile Crescent hasnt been anything for a loooong time. Its not at all relevant to anything. Its nothing but an arid desert now. Im not sure why this is even news.




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