west/east culture difference - view of death in religion 26 replies

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Junk angel

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#1 11 years ago

I have taken part in the religious thread fro some time, and as anyone can clearly tell, it is far more centered around western faiths.

Also a very large difference between the western and eastern cultures is seen there.

The view of death.

My question is.

Why, are western cultures death denying, and that since pagan times, searching for ways of a continuation of life even after death, in afterlives, where our being, if you would call it this way, remains almost virtually unchanged, and our lives continue.

Whereas, many faiths in the eastern lands (for instance hinduism) seek the "final" death, a way to cease existance. For some reason, these cultures are death accepting.

Both cultures use similar ways to attain there ideals, being good being faithfull etc, yet why is there such a large difference between the two. What sparked it in the first place?




Primarch Vulkan VIP Member

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#2 11 years ago

Western culture sees death as the end, whilst I see it as just another journey the body dies but the Ka lives on. Hinduism believes in recantation the final death is when they stop being reborn and can now exstist with there Gods forever. [COLOR=black][/COLOR]


[color=#000000][size=2][b][i]Heralds of the coming doom, Like the cry of the Raven, we are drawn, This oath of war and vengeance, On a blade of exalted iron sworn, With blood anointed swords



Junk angel

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#3 11 years ago

Actually it's a bit different

Hinduism views this final death as a moment when they become one with the god, when they themselves cease to exist.

Whereas western cultures, with their concept of the afterlife, see a sort of life after death.

Their personalities remain virtually unchanged in the afterlife.




Primarch Vulkan VIP Member

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#4 11 years ago

Well I tried...oh well learn something new everyday.


[color=#000000][size=2][b][i]Heralds of the coming doom, Like the cry of the Raven, we are drawn, This oath of war and vengeance, On a blade of exalted iron sworn, With blood anointed swords



Aeroflot

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#5 11 years ago

wraithcat;3852234

Why, are western cultures death denying, and that since pagan times, searching for ways of a continuation of life even after death, in afterlives, where our being, if you would call it this way, remains almost virtually unchanged, and our lives continue.

Whereas, many faiths in the eastern lands (for instance hinduism) seek the "final" death, a way to cease existance. For some reason, these cultures are death accepting.

Both cultures use similar ways to attain there ideals, being good being faithfull etc, yet why is there such a large difference between the two. What sparked it in the first place?

Interesting topic. I think both in the West and the East the cultures are not death-accepting, and the existence of religion is proof of that. People are scared and they want reassurances that things will be better when they die.




Junk angel

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#6 11 years ago

but the aim of both religions is utterly different.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#7 11 years ago

Hinduism seems to hold with the belief that the essence of your being goes on to become part of something greater than yourself, attaining a sort of immortality and ending the cycle of suffering and gain. It’s not really the same as ceasing to exist.




Junk angel

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#8 11 years ago

From what I understand - at least from my 9+ year stay in india, it's actually a sort of ceasing of existence, they truly seek to be freed of life, of sentience if you will. Of course a part of my knowledge of hinduism comes from a religion teacher, but nevertheless that's what I've been thought that hinduists believe in. Though I'm not sure what is the exact belief of the afterlife by taoists and konfucianists.




Aeroflot

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#9 11 years ago
wraithcat;3852315but the aim of both religions is utterly different.

Are they?

The Hindus want to be free of life, because life is painful. The Christians want to be free of life, because life is painful.




Junk angel

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#10 11 years ago

The christians try to attain a continuation of life in the afterlife -- even the name insists that it is a life.

The same can be said about a lot of european pagan cultures, islam and others.

Whereas the hindus wish to get out of the eternal circle of life, and reach death.

It is different when you look at it.

Of course, it might be, that my view is skewed, but who knows...