When We Get Up There 39 replies

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Flash525

The Carbon Comrade

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14th July 2004

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#1 14 years ago

Although we have already breached our atmosphere, and travelled to the Moon, along with sending probes throughout the universe and to other planets / moons within our solar system, I'd like to gather thoughts from the GF community on what you think is going to happen once we reach the stars. At some point in the time of humanity, we are going to develop the technology to travel the universe (much like in television programmes, and Science-fiction movies) - although all fiction at present! - At some point we are going to make that giant leap to the stars. What do you think (or) what would you like to think is up there waiting for us (if anything)? - Please don't turn this thread into another "Do Aliens Exist" - that isn't the aim of it. As for me... I personally believe that we will one day get up there, and will come face to face with thousands of other species (not necessarily humanoid). I also believe that humanity will conquer other planets and settle down on them. I can also see it happening that humanity end up in civil wars with each other. Each trying to dominate (as they do now) - just in space on ships rather than on the ground of planets. I do believe alliances will be made, broken, wars will be fought, and new illnesses will catch up with us. On a side note of this, the majority of science-fiction shows show that (as long as the planet in question is that of an M Class - Star Trek for example) then we will be able to survive on it. I like to look at it from the "War of the Worlds" point of view, and that all planets (regardless of classification) present new illnesses and diseases. Each with new threats (the creatures that live there would be another example). Anyway, what do you think? Do you think we will get up there to find nothing, find plenty, or do you believe humanity will wipe itself out before we advance as far as we would need to in order to explore the galaxy? Discuss...




Pethegreat Advanced Member

Lord of the Peach

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19th April 2004

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#2 14 years ago

Humanity has always been on the brink of killing everything, espically so in the last 60 years, but it only came close once during the cuban missle crisis.

I bet in 2 to 3 thousand years we will have a good ammount of people on mars(1 to 2 billion) and could be tetraforming it. All you need is some extremly hardy desert plants and let them go. In time they will convert the CO2 on mars into oxygen and eventually form a thicker atmosphere protecting people on mars from radation and making the planet warmer.

Unless we manage to travel many times faster than the speed of light, which is impossible according to some people, I doubt we will meet any aliens like on star trek or star wars. If we last say ten's of thousands of years or get faster than light travel then it won't be a matter of wether we will find someone out there, but when we will find someone and wether they want to kill us.




Chemix2

Paladin: The Holy Knight

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16th March 2005

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#3 14 years ago

War will happen, do you really think any nation is going to pass going to pass up a whole planet just because another got there first. Thats resources, land, a base, testing grounds. Ultimately China will take the early lead and control mars, but soon after Russia and America will begin a new space race for the next planet. When interstellar travel is discovered, hell will break loose and nuclear war will start up.




nowhereman

For KAVATCH!!!

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20th April 2005

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#4 14 years ago

I can't see us lasting more than a hundred years. We have too many problems in the world to advance any further, war in the middle east is spreading and will continue to spread. Already we are talking about war with Nprth Korea and Iran.

Oil will be depleated within 50 years. There is no way we can make a transition from oil to hydrogen engines. Fusion sounds good in the scientific shows but we are a long way from making a working fusion reactor.

^yea thats all of topic but it stated one of my points.

Meeting aliens could happen but only by there choice. If we havent already made contact.

Every world opens possibilities both good and bad.

1-2 billion people on mars is alot. Terraforming would cost a ton of money. Look at mars it is 6,794 Km in diameter and has a 95% carbon dioxide atmosphere. Terra forming would be nearl impossible. However our very great grandchildren could live in bubbles.




Revenge Advanced Member

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28th July 2004

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#5 14 years ago

I believe in what Einstein said, so I think we'll never reach any of the stars except the very close ones ( < 60 lightyears) without developing some sort of cryogenic process, which isn't going to happen (cells die when frozen, and these are the main part of what makes a human, basically). This is because according to the Theory of Relativity, nothing can travel faster than the speed of light because you would become an infinite mass. There is also the problem of friction, which varies as the square of velocity (velocity²): this would become much greater than any force we can generate with conventional or concept techniques.

So the only way for exploration would be for a load of astronaughts to bread and live their entire lives in space, but this has other problems - you must exercise for four or five hours a day in space to avoid your spine becoming too weak to carry your body (due to lack of gravity). Also, across an entire lifetime in space you will receive small (but large by Earth standards) doses of radiation from the Sun, which will build up over a lifetime and cut a few years off your natural life. However, you will probably live around the same amount of time as an Earthling, because the years taken off by radiation will be countered by the air purity and lack of cleanliness of the food and drink.

...And this brings human rights into play. What if you were born in space, but decided you didn't want to work for humanity and explore, or learn anything to do with space? What if you were born without the ability to reproduce?

Humanity faces a bit of a bugger with all of these concepts: it will be too complicated to explore any further than the very closest stars without the rules of the universe changing drastically. However, these rules can randomly change, but it's very unlikely to be radical. Something like the speed of light isn't going to change.

I would think the way our ascendants will explore the universe will be by machines. We will have to invent robots which are sturdy enough to last centuries and survive the journeys they'll make, and be able to beam back information to Earth. This will take many, many decades to happen - if a probe were to circle our nearest star, it would take 40 years to send information to and from the probe to Earth each time it is sent. That's a bit impractical, because the people who send the request for information could well be dead or retired and most likely working elsewhere by the time the response is received.

Isn't life, the universe and everything annoying?




LIGHTNING [NL]

FH2 Developer

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30th May 2003

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#6 14 years ago

I think at one point, far before we obtain the technology to 'travel to the stars', mankind will set aside it's petty differences and unite. Working together, we will develop spaceships, but they are unable to go faster than the speed of light, so even the trip to the nearest inhabitable planet will take more than a lifetime. So the ships will have 'suspended animation' technology, where the crew of a ship will be kept asleep for hundreds of years, and awoken only when the ship reaches the solar system of the planet.

These ships will not look like the ones in star trek. They are not streamlined and don't have a 'finished' look. They are ugly big black blocks, powered by a source like nuclear fusion.

Because nothing travels faster than the speed of light, there will be no ways of communicating to earth quickly. (Assuming the ship can reach the speed of light, the radiomessages will go as quickly as the ships) So as soon as the first colonization ship reaches the surface, a radio message is dispatched, confirming the expected status of the planet. Immediately thereafter another ship is launched from earth. This is a population ship. It contains hundreds of thousands of embryo's in suspended animation, that will not be 'hatched' until the ship arrives at the planet hundreds of years later. In the mean while, the first ship, not only containing colonisers, but also a vast amount of terraforming machines, will have made the planet fit for life. And by this I mean, fit with the proper facilities to maintain a population of about a million men. At the point where the population ship's embryo's are fully grown men and women, the planet is considered colonised.

There are two scenario's in which I think my system will be applied: - All colonised planets are at their maximum capability - Man kind is set on universal domination, and sends out ships like this to as many places as possible, hoping to spread the human race throughout the entire universe.

Am I rambling...? I'll stop.




marvinmatthew

Tech is where you'll find me..

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13th April 2005

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#7 14 years ago

'LIGHTNING [NL']Because nothing travels faster than the speed of light, there will be no ways of communicating to earth quickly. (Assuming the ship can reach the speed of light, the radiomessages will go as quickly as the ships) So as soon as the first colonization ship reaches the surface, a radio message is dispatched, confirming the expected status of the planet. Immediately thereafter another ship is launched from earth. This is a population ship. It contains hundreds of thousands of embryo's in suspended animation, that will not be 'hatched' until the ship arrives at the planet hundreds of years later. In the mean while, the first ship, not only containing colonisers, but also a vast amount of terraforming machines, will have made the planet fit for life. And by this I mean, fit with the proper facilities to maintain a population of about a million men. At the point where the population ship's embryo's are fully grown men and women, the planet is considered colonised.

There are two scenario's in which I think my system will be applied: - All colonised planets are at their maximum capability - Man kind is set on universal domination, and sends out ships like this to as many places as possible, hoping to spread the human race throughout the entire universe.

Am I rambling...? I'll stop.

Hmmm, I can see that you've thought this out. This sinerio is interesting, and seems to be relativley practical. Good thinking I, like it.




Revenge Advanced Member

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#8 14 years ago

I'm sure that other planets will already have human-like species (human-like in atomic makeup but not necessarily and probably not the same looking - humans have adapted to what suits Earth best. On other planets, the most intelligent lifeform will be adapt to their planets), and we'll find them. Communication will be a bitch though, because there is absolutely nothing in common - with native Pacific island tribes we can communicate with them through their drawings and stuff, but on other planets the species could use an entirely different method of expression. For instance, they might express themselves using ultrasonic sound, which we can't hear. It's not like the movies where every planet speaks English.

I doubt many people saw the program 'Odyssey' which was on the BBC a few months ago - it was a fact-based docu-drama about a world-wide effort to land on every suitable planet in our solar system (obviously planets like Mercury couldn't be landed on due to heat and gravity). It was great.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/programmes/spaceodyssey/




LIGHTNING [NL]

FH2 Developer

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#9 14 years ago
RevenI'm sure that other planets will already have human-like species (human-like in atomic makeup but not necessarily and probably not the same looking - humans have adapted to what suits Earth best.

Funny thing is that we only look like apes, because of the meteor (or whatever it was) that killed the dinosaurs. Had all dinosaurs not been driven to extinction, the earth would probably be ruled by some kind of decendant from an intelligent dinosaur species (like the well-known velociraptor for example). No doubt, we'd still be made out of the same cells with the same make-up our DNA currently uses, but we'd be all scaly, have big teeth, be cold blooded and we'd lay eggs.

Or maybe not... Who can tell?




Psychokenesis

I'm too cool to Post

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16th October 2003

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#10 14 years ago

There is really only a space race at stake...No celestial body can be claimed by a nation state. that was aimed at Chemix2. THE US has broken this treaty to a degree by insisting on the Star Wars platform.

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Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies

The Outer Space Treaty was considered by the Legal Subcommittee in 1966 and agreement was reached in the General Assembly in the same year (resolution 2222 (XXI). The Treaty was largely based on the Declaration of Legal Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, which had been adopted by the General Assembly in its resolution 1962 (XVIII) in 1963, but added a few new provisions. The Treaty was opened for signature by the three depository Governments (the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America) in January 1967, and it entered into force in October 1967. The Outer Space Treaty provides the basic framework on international space law, including the following principles:

the exploration and use of outer space shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries and shall be the province of all mankind; outer space shall be free for exploration and use by all States; outer space is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means; States shall not place nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction in orbit or on celestial bodies or station them in outer space in any other manner; the Moon and other celestial bodies shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes; astronauts shall be regarded as the envoys of mankind; States shall be responsible for national space activities whether carried out by governmental or non-governmental activities; States shall be liable for damage caused by their space objects; and States shall avoid harmful contamination of space and celestial bodies.

98 States have ratified, and an additional 27 have signed the Outer Space Treaty (as of 1 January 2005).For further information, see the Treaty Status Index.Treaty Status Index.

The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies is available in the following languages and formats.