which came first, the snake or the monkey 16 replies

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masked_marsoe Advanced Member

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#11 11 years ago

Seeing as snakes are believed to have evolved from around 150 million years ago.

As for 'Monkeys', the Haplorrhini suborder developed around 63 million years ago, and then split again into Simiiformes (monekys and apes) and Tarsiformes (tarsiers).

Around 40 million years ago, Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys, with prehensile tails) split from Simiiformes, which turned into Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys and Apes).

Catarrhini split into Cercopithecoidea (Old Word Monkeys, non-prehensile tails) and Hominoidea (great apes and humans around 25 million years ago.




DawnOfDiablo666

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#12 11 years ago
masked_marsoe;4595473Seeing as snakes are believed to have evolved from around 150 million years ago. As for 'Monkeys', the Haplorrhini suborder developed around 63 million years ago, and then split again into Simiiformes (monekys and apes) and Tarsiformes (tarsiers). Around 40 million years ago, Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys, with prehensile tails) split from Simiiformes, which turned into Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys and Apes). Catarrhini split into Cercopithecoidea (Old Word Monkeys, non-prehensile tails) and Hominoidea (great apes and humans around 25 million years ago.

He says snakes...




rakattack

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#13 11 years ago

neither, they both came to be at the same time




crisissuit3

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#14 11 years ago
Mr. Pedantic;4594479I think the snake. But honestly, does it matter? And if so, why does it matter?

just wanted to know what everyone else thinks. sometimes i want to know what other people think about a topic.




Mr. Matt Advanced Member

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#15 11 years ago

There is a reason he's called 'Mr. Pedantic' you know ;).

Anyway, snakes were unquestionably around before monkeys. It's a very random question actually. Snakes or serpents are thought to date from the Cretaceous period or earlier, a couple of hundred million years ago, but they don't fossilise very well so they could be even older. Some people believe they might be related to large marine reptiles that used to dominate the oceans, but I can't recall their name. Distant ancestors of primates didn't really spring up until the end of that period or later, though it certainly wouldn't be any species you recognise today.




Mr. Pedantic

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#16 11 years ago
There is a reason he's called 'Mr. Pedantic' you know winkx.gif.

:rolleyes:

Some people believe they might be related to large marine reptiles that used to dominate the oceans, but I can't recall their name.

Could they be mosasaurs? They bear more resemblance to alligators and crocodiles, but hey...

Distant ancestors of primates didn't really spring up until the end of that period or later, though it certainly wouldn't be any species you recognise today.

Mammals have all evolved relatively quickly: there was no such thing as a land (or marine) mammal larger than a book before the KT-Extinction and the end of the Cretaceous, after which they flourished in the absence of the dominant life-form at the time, reptiles.




crisissuit3

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#17 11 years ago
Mr. Matt;4595931There is a reason he's called 'Mr. Pedantic' you know ;). Anyway, snakes were unquestionably around before monkeys. It's a very random question actually. Snakes or serpents are thought to date from the Cretaceous period or earlier, a couple of hundred million years ago, but they don't fossilise very well so they could be even older. Some people believe they might be related to large marine reptiles that used to dominate the oceans, but I can't recall their name. Distant ancestors of primates didn't really spring up until the end of that period or later, though it certainly wouldn't be any species you recognise today.

tried a google search, and i found this. Fossil found of prehistoric snake with two rear legs a relative of the snake perhaps?




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