your country's school system 47 replies

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Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#1 14 years ago

Tell us about your country's schools system, here is some info on the duth system:

The Dutch school system:

Since the foundation of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in 1815, the government has been responsible for ensuring that all Dutch children receive an adequate education. Not that it has a monopoly of schools or the right to dictate what is taught in them. Under the 1848 Constitution, any group of people may set up a school based on religious or philosophical beliefs or educational principles.

The government is of course responsible for supervising the educational system. School attendance is compulsory for children aged five to 18, though in the final two years they are only obliged to attend part time. The subjects taught in all types of school are laid down by law, as are attainment targets. This enables the government to ensure that qualifications are uniform throughout the country.

Schools set up by public authorities - usually municipalities - are called public-authority schools. All other schools, founded by private bodies, are called private schools. More than 75% of Dutch schools are private, but the government awards funding to all schools meeting certain criteria. Similarly, teachers' salaries are decided nationally. In 2000, the Netherlands spent 5.2% of its GDP on education. Children of compulsory school age receive education free of charge, although parents of secondary-school children have to pay for their books and other material. All parents, irrespective of income, receive a state allowance called child benefit.

Students aged 18 or older have to pay for their education. Fees for most higher-education programmes are the same. All students aged 18 or older receive a basic state grant, which they may supplement with a loan. The amount of the loan will depend on the student's income (or that of his/her parents) and his/her educational performance. Students aged 18 or older are also entitled to a public transport season ticket at a reduced price. 19.2% of those aged 18 to 27 are currently receiving some form of higher education full time, and 0.8% are part-time students. Few Dutch schools, colleges or universities provide accommodation for their students, and there are no dress codes or school uniforms.

primary school: In The Netherlands, children can go to school when they reached the age of 4, but they have to go, when they are 5.

The children then go to the primary school. This school is divided in 8 groups. The first two levels are kindergarten.

Primary schools in the Netherlands cater for children aged four to 12. The eight-year primary-school programme focuses on pupils' emotional, intellectual and creative development along with the acquisition of essential social, cultural and physical skills. Every primary school draws up its own school work plan, based on criteria laid down by the government.

There are special schools for those aged three to 20 who suffer from physical, mental or social disabilities. As far as possible, they are taught the mainstream curriculum, but receive extra attention to enable them to enter or return to a mainstream school. The government recently launched its "Going to School Together" project, which encourages mainstream and special primary schools to cooperate more closely.

Secondary education: When the children leave group 8, they go to the secondary school.

There are 3 levels:

1 pre-vocational secondary education --> VMBO (4 years) 2 senior general secondary education --> HAVO (5 years) 3 pre-university education --> VWO (6 Years)

VWO is the most difficult and VMBO is the least difficult.

VMBO Students will have a practical occupation, for example carpenter, butcher, etc.

HAVO Students can go to college. They can for example become a teacher.

VWO Students can go to university.

Most secondary schools provide more than one of these types of education. VMBO takes four years and leads on to senior secondary vocational education (MBO) or apprenticeship programmes. HAVO is a five-year programme and leads on to higher professional education (HBO). VWO takes six years and leads on to university (WO). Pupils in the first three years of secondary school are all taught the same core curriculum, consisting of 15 subjects. 95.7% of all 17-year-olds in the Netherlands have currently either completed or are still attending secondary school full time.

schuls2.jpgTertiary or higher education

Higher education comprises higher professional (HBO) and university education (WO). September 2002 saw the introduction of the bachelor-master system. Programmes leading to a bachelor’s degree take three years at universities (study load of 180 credits) and four at HBO institutions (study load of 240 credits). Graduates with a bachelor’s degree can go on to do a master’s degree. A master’s course usually takes between one and two years, depending on the subject (study load of 60-120 credits). A master’s in medicine, however, takes three years (study load of 180 credits). 19.2% of those aged 18 to 27 are currently attending some form of higher education full time, and 0.8% are part-time students. Once students have graduated, they may specialise or carry out research. The Netherlands has nine general universities, three technological universities and one agricultural university, all with specialised research institutes.

Titles

Graduates can choose between a bachelor’s/master’s title and the traditional titles. Traditionally, graduates of colleges of higher professional education bear the title Ingenieur (Ing) or Baccalaureus (B). Graduates of the technological universities bear the title Ingenieur (Ir), those graduating in law bear the title Meester (Mr), and all other university graduates bear the title Doctorandus (Drs). University graduates may instead choose to bear the title Master (M), and those who have earned a doctorate may bear the title Doctor (Dr). All these titles are specified and protected by law.

Adult education

Adult education encompasses most of the types of education described above. Adults may attend part-time or full-time programmes, during the day or in the evening, and at either secondary or higher level. The Open University, with its wide variety of programmes, plays a special part in adult education.

International education

For children receiving part of their primary or secondary education abroad (for instance because their parents work abroad), there are schools where the whole curriculum is taught in English, French or German and culminates in an international baccalaureate certificate. In addition, the Netherlands has ten university institutes offering specialist programmes to foreign postgraduate students in English and occasionally in French or Spanish.

Research

The objective of science and research policy is to maintain an effective, high-quality knowledge infrastructure in the Netherlands. In addition to regular research investment, the government is currently spending more than 200 million euros on 12 promising projects involving cooperation between the public and private sectors. Although the Minister of Education, Culture and Science coordinates science and research policy, the other ministers are responsible for this policy within their own domains. Research institutes, which are usually attached to universities, receive funding from the government, but they may also apply for grants from funds managed by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (TNO). In addition, they may earn money by providing courses or carrying out contract research for business. As you can read elsewhere in this booklet, the Netherlands is a research leader in hydraulic engineering, chemistry and information technology.

For Children with Special Needs, there are two kinds of special Schools:

SBO and REC

SBO is for the children who have learning and/or social problems.

There are 4 kinds of REC’s:

  • REC 1: For Children with Visual handicaps.
  • REC 2: for Children with Communication problems (deaf, etc.)
  • REC 3: Children with Several handicaps or psychic problems
  • REC 4: For Children with serious Learning disabilities.

Before a child can go to a SBO or a REC, there is an authoritative source, who will decide if a child can go to the special needs school.

When a child has to go to a REC, the parents can let their child go to a regular school. This regular school gets extra funds to give the child extra care. This is called Backpack policy.

A child from a SBO can also return to the regular school. sources: http://www.minbuza.nl/default.asp?CMS_NOCOOKIES=YES&CMS_ITEM=MBZ302753 http://www.evang-vs.diakonie.salzburg.at/ini/forum/schulsystem_nl_en.htm _____________________________________________________ I have followed primary schools for 9 years (had toi do group 2 twices because i wasn't ready yet for group 3). Then I followed VWO for 3 years, and after that i decided to switch to HAVO because i was not sure if i could completle the (more diffivult) VWO. I finished secundary school 2 years later (after HAVO 4 en HAVO5) and i'm now in the first year of HBO (college). To sum things up: All kids go to primary school, after that you go to sec. school and have to choose between VMBO/HAVO/VWO (the level of intiligence you got will decide to which level you go. The VMBO people learn other stuff then the VWO people, because VWO people are smarter and have to learn more and more difficult data. After that you can go to MBO (for VMBO people), HBO or WO. (Again, the system provides different levels based on the level of int. of people). primary school --> Secondary school --> Tertiary or higher education IMO its a fair and good system, so now tell us about your school system and its pro's and con's, and give us your opinion on other school systems.




Spartan VIP Member

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#2 14 years ago

American public schools have very inconsistent performance. There are lots of poor inner-city schools that could use a ton of money. Baltimore's is one of the worst. The system is in debt to the tune of around $70 million last time I heard. Miss-management by the directors.




Artie

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#3 14 years ago

America: The average suburban kid in the 9th grade is studying Algebra 2 in the US, while the average kid of the same age is studying Calculus in Russia.

America: The average suburban kid begins learning a second language in 6th grade while the average Russian child begins learning English in 2nd grade.

America: The average college-bound student's family is forced to cover $40,000 dollars a year for him to go to a private institution while the average Russian college student studies for free.

America: The average high school student couldn't locate Afghanistan on a world map prior to September 11th. :lol: :lol: :lol:




Mazz

BFE-WAW

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16th November 2003

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#4 14 years ago

Artie there was no reason for you to post dumb shit like that. period.

You couldve just stated Russias facts and not worried about making Russia look much more superior to the US.

Somebody should lock this now before it gets out of hand. I will agree with Spartan as I live in the suburbs now but my friend goes to a school on the south side of chicago. The schools are very different.




Spartan VIP Member

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#5 14 years ago

Let's keep it clean and calm down...




striderx2048

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#6 14 years ago

move this thread please




Dreadnought[DK] VIP Member

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#7 14 years ago

*moved on the request of the author*




Spartan VIP Member

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#8 14 years ago

Woah, I hadn't even noticed. That General Discussion title in the FH forums really threw me off. :uhoh:




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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#9 14 years ago
ArtieAmerica: The average suburban kid in the 9th grade is studying Algebra 2 in the US, while the average kid of the same age is studying Calculus in Russia. America: The average suburban kid begins learning a second language in 6th grade while the average Russian child begins learning English in 2nd grade. America: The average college-bound student's family is forced to cover $40,000 dollars a year for him to go to a private institution while the average Russian college student studies for free. America: The average high school student couldn't locate Afghanistan on a world map prior to September 11th. :lol: :lol: :lol:[/QUOTE] Hmm I alayws didn't liek the american school system that much, that one of the main reasons for me to make this thread: to let me/us understand the american and other school systems better. Tell me how is the american school system divided, you have the primairy school, secundary school, elementary (sp?) etc. explain to me what kinds of schools/levels/grades there are. I now a few basis things about the system but i could always update my knowledge. I we?) ofcourse also want to hear from other countries. [QUOTE='Dreadnought[DK]']*moved on the request of the author*

thanks Dreadnought, i made the post in the wrong forum by mistake because i (always) have over 15 or 20 windows with GF pages in it (I use mozilla firefox as my browser so i have "15 tabs" in 1 window). I was bussy gathering intel etc. and posted in the wrong forum, shame on me! :D




Pethegreat VIP Member

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19th April 2004

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#10 14 years ago

i go to a private school. they have VERY Performance. Many kids in my school test high in the Standardized testing