Hai guise 8 replies

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Vantage

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#1 10 years ago

So if you have a vector space of, say, 4 dimensions, you can't expect to have a basis of any number of vectors other than that many, can you? For example, I can't have a four vector set be a basis for R^3?




Vasili

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#2 10 years ago

I have a dog.




Vantage

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#3 10 years ago

I know, she comes to my house twice a week to solve her emotional problems (through physical means).

Spoiler: Show
We're talking about your girlfriend right?
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I kid, I kid.

But really, I think I am right. You can't have more vectors in a basis set than there are dimensions in your vector space.




Vasili

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#4 10 years ago

We're talking about both.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#5 10 years ago

I believe not Vantage. I'll fetch my linear algebra book if you need confirmation. I think it is true because any extra vectors are actually linear combinations of the basis set, thus making that set a general set within R^n.

EDIT: Actually, I'm sure of it.




Vantage

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#6 10 years ago

I am glad we concur.




Vasili

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#7 10 years ago

Sooo.... Can you make nukes with it?




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#8 10 years ago

No, but you can with canned swiss cheese.




Vasili

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#9 10 years ago

Show me this ingenious idea!