Killer Kyle 24 replies

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Pethegreat VIP Member

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#1 8 years ago

Do you know anything about gas compressibility?

I know you know the rankie cycle.




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#2 8 years ago

Pethegreat;5421850Do you know anything about gas compressibility?

I know you know the rankie cycle.

hmm no point asking me i dunno




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#3 8 years ago

Mostly, yeah. Isn't the Rankine Cycle for steam engines? Those run between gas and water, though.

We never did any work or go over Rankine cycles in my last two thermo classes. It's always Carnot cycles (everyone loves the Carnot cycle ;)) and I did some HW on the Stirling Engine cycle.

Anyway, what's your question?




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#4 8 years ago

I just need to know how I treat the del v over del P term in the first equation listed on this page

Compressibility - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I have a constant temperature assumption.




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#5 8 years ago
Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#6 8 years ago

Are you talking about the fact that you've never seeing those funny d's?




Pethegreat VIP Member

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#7 8 years ago
Killer Kyle;5422421Are you talking about the fact that you've never seeing those funny d's?

I have seen them before. I think I simply have to take the partial derivative of my volume expression(PV=ZnRT) with respect to pressure, but I am not certain.

I still got another day to work on it.




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#8 8 years ago

You're on the right track. I've never seen the Ideal Gas Law with a Z in it before, though. Isothermal also means that you can throw T out of the derivative.




Pb2Au

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#9 8 years ago

The ideal gas law doesn't have Z in it. The compressibility factor for gas (Z) is what turns the ideal law into the real law. At STP Z=1. Pethe, when I get home tonight I'll see if I can dig up my old thermo work.




Pb2Au

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#10 8 years ago

We did Otto, diesel, Rankine and Carnot.