Students!!!Problems with academic papers and essays??? 11 replies

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#1 11 years ago

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Polska

"The original one"

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19th September 2004

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#2 11 years ago

Don't do your own homework, let someone else do it - buy now and stay dumb for the rest of your life! :thumbsdown:




Jackthehammer

You can either agree with meor be wrong.

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12th November 2003

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#3 11 years ago

Formula to find the uniform velocity that the water will have in a ditch or in a canal of which the slope is known." This document resides in the same file [No. 847, Ms. 1915]. v = 272 (ah/p)1/2

in which h is the slope, a is the area, and p is the wetted perimeter. The coefficient 272 is given for the canal of Courpalet in an old system of units. In the metric system, the equivalent value is:

v = 31 (ah/p)1/2

the velocity obtained from each formula for a given slope and for hydraulic radius varying from 0.25 m to 30 m. Then, for each condition, he found the mean value of the seven velocities and developed a formula that best fitted the data.

The first best-fit formula was the following:

V = 32 [RS (1 + R 1/3 )] 1/2

He then simplified this formula to:

V = C R x S 1/2

In 1885, Manning gave x the value of 2/3 and wrote his formula as follows:

V = C R 2/3 S1/2

The reciprocal of C corresponds closely with that of n, as determined by Ganguillet and Kutter; both C and n being constant for the same channel."

(P-.2S)² Q=----------- (Q=0 if P<.2S) P+.8S

1000 where S=------- - 10 CN

Q=Precipitation excess (runoff) [inches] P=Cumulative precipitation [inches] S=Potential maximum retention [inches] CN=SCS Curve Number

To determine how the runoff is distributed over time we must introduce a time-dependent factor. The time-of-concentration, or Tc, is utilized for SCS methods.

scsrain.gif

The Tc is most often defined as the time required for a particle of water to travel from the most hydrologically remote point in the watershed to the point of collection. There are several methods available for calculating Tc, one of which is the Lag Method:

L l^.8 (S+1)^.7 Tc = --- where L = ----------------- .6 1900 Y^.5

1000 and S = -------- - 10 CN

TC=Time of concentration [hours] L=Lag time [hours] l=Hydraulic length of watershed [feet] Y=Average land slope [percent] S=Potential maximum retention [inches] CN=Weighed Curve Number

The unit hydrograph, when dimensioned, tells us what the runoff will be for a single burst of rainfall. To determine the runoff for the entire storm, we must perform a convolution of the unit hydrograph with the precipitation excess. This is simply a summation of many unit hydrographs, each of which represents one burst of runoff.

uh.gif

The process is as follows:

1) For the first burst (of duration D) we determine the precipitation excess and create a corresponding Unit Hydrograph.

2) For the next burst we determine the precipitation excess occurring during the interval D which is Q=Q(t+D)-Q(t). We create the corresponding UH, translate it by the duration D, and add it to the previous result.

3) Step 2 is repeated for all durations D needed to compose the entire 24-hour storm.

The resulting hydrograph represents the runoff from the entire storm. This is the fundamental method used by TR-20 for predicting runoff.

Note that if Tc=7.5 minutes, D=1 minute, and a 24-hour storm will consist of 1440 bursts generating an equal number of unit hydrographs. If the UH consists of 100 coordinates, about 140,000 coordinates must be summed to produce the composite hydrograph! Obviously, such a technique cannot be performed by hand.

If you can do my Hydrology homework, I'll eat my shoes.




GOD111

I Am Teh God

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1st July 2004

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#4 11 years ago

jackthehammer;3524746Formula to find the uniform velocity that the water will have in a ditch or in a canal of which the slope is known." This document resides in the same file [No. 847, Ms. 1915]. v = 272 (ah/p)1/2

in which h is the slope, a is the area, and p is the wetted perimeter. The coefficient 272 is given for the canal of Courpalet in an old system of units. In the metric system, the equivalent value is:

v = 31 (ah/p)1/2

the velocity obtained from each formula for a given slope and for hydraulic radius varying from 0.25 m to 30 m. Then, for each condition, he found the mean value of the seven velocities and developed a formula that best fitted the data.

The first best-fit formula was the following:

V = 32 [RS (1 + R 1/3 )] 1/2

He then simplified this formula to:

V = C R x S 1/2

In 1885, Manning gave x the value of 2/3 and wrote his formula as follows:

V = C R 2/3 S1/2

The reciprocal of C corresponds closely with that of n, as determined by Ganguillet and Kutter; both C and n being constant for the same channel."

(P-.2S)² Q=----------- (Q=0 if P<.2S) P+.8S

1000 where S=------- - 10 CN

Q=Precipitation excess (runoff) [inches] P=Cumulative precipitation [inches] S=Potential maximum retention [inches] CN=SCS Curve Number

To determine how the runoff is distributed over time we must introduce a time-dependent factor. The time-of-concentration, or Tc, is utilized for SCS methods.

scsrain.gif

The Tc is most often defined as the time required for a particle of water to travel from the most hydrologically remote point in the watershed to the point of collection. There are several methods available for calculating Tc, one of which is the Lag Method:

L l^.8 (S+1)^.7 Tc = --- where L = ----------------- .6 1900 Y^.5

1000 and S = -------- - 10 CN

TC=Time of concentration [hours] L=Lag time [hours] l=Hydraulic length of watershed [feet] Y=Average land slope [percent] S=Potential maximum retention [inches] CN=Weighed Curve Number

The unit hydrograph, when dimensioned, tells us what the runoff will be for a single burst of rainfall. To determine the runoff for the entire storm, we must perform a convolution of the unit hydrograph with the precipitation excess. This is simply a summation of many unit hydrographs, each of which represents one burst of runoff.

uh.gif

The process is as follows:

1) For the first burst (of duration D) we determine the precipitation excess and create a corresponding Unit Hydrograph.

2) For the next burst we determine the precipitation excess occurring during the interval D which is Q=Q(t+D)-Q(t). We create the corresponding UH, translate it by the duration D, and add it to the previous result.

3) Step 2 is repeated for all durations D needed to compose the entire 24-hour storm.

The resulting hydrograph represents the runoff from the entire storm. This is the fundamental method used by TR-20 for predicting runoff.

Note that if Tc=7.5 minutes, D=1 minute, and a 24-hour storm will consist of 1440 bursts generating an equal number of unit hydrographs. If the UH consists of 100 coordinates, about 140,000 coordinates must be summed to produce the composite hydrograph! Obviously, such a technique cannot be performed by hand.

If you can do my Hydrology homework, I'll eat my shoes.

:wtf: :n0e:

What ever floats your boat dude:lookaround:




ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

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6th December 2006

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#5 11 years ago

How about deleting this thread / moving it to "shameless advertiser" section ? :hmm:




Red Menace

SCHOFIELD DID 4/30

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10th August 2004

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#6 11 years ago

Last edited by *SW3D3* : 4 Minutes Ago at 08:39 AM. Reason: removed email link, but decided to keep the post due the effort in Jacks post:P And Jack, all you need is love, love is all you need. <3!


sigpic82523_3.gif</div></body></html>



ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

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6th December 2006

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#7 11 years ago

Well there still is a clear domain name in the first post...




Jackthehammer

You can either agree with meor be wrong.

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12th November 2003

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#8 11 years ago
Red Menace;3524796Last edited by *SW3D3* : 4 Minutes Ago at 08:39 AM. Reason: removed email link, but decided to keep the post due the effort in Jacks post:P And Jack, all you need is love, love is all you need. <3!

That and more braincells, I quit going to hydrology lessons 2 years ago after it came to the point of making my head explode. there's no use, I just don't get it and I never will.




ConstanceJill

Huh yeah, whatever ^^

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6th December 2006

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#9 11 years ago

Braaaiiins




Mast3rofPuppets VIP Member

08'aIgnorance is not an excuse

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28th November 2003

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#10 11 years ago

jackthehammer;3524746Formula to find the uniform velocity that the water will have in a ditch or in a canal of which the slope is known." This document resides in the same file [No. 847, Ms. 1915]. v = 272 (ah/p)1/2

in which h is the slope, a is the area, and p is the wetted perimeter. The coefficient 272 is given for the canal of Courpalet in an old system of units. In the metric system, the equivalent value is:

v = 31 (ah/p)1/2

the velocity obtained from each formula for a given slope and for hydraulic radius varying from 0.25 m to 30 m. Then, for each condition, he found the mean value of the seven velocities and developed a formula that best fitted the data.

The first best-fit formula was the following:

V = 32 [RS (1 + R 1/3 )] 1/2

He then simplified this formula to:

V = C R x S 1/2

In 1885, Manning gave x the value of 2/3 and wrote his formula as follows:

V = C R 2/3 S1/2

The reciprocal of C corresponds closely with that of n, as determined by Ganguillet and Kutter; both C and n being constant for the same channel."

(P-.2S)² Q=----------- (Q=0 if P<.2S) P+.8S

1000 where S=------- - 10 CN

Q=Precipitation excess (runoff) [inches] P=Cumulative precipitation [inches] S=Potential maximum retention [inches] CN=SCS Curve Number

To determine how the runoff is distributed over time we must introduce a time-dependent factor. The time-of-concentration, or Tc, is utilized for SCS methods.

scsrain.gif

The Tc is most often defined as the time required for a particle of water to travel from the most hydrologically remote point in the watershed to the point of collection. There are several methods available for calculating Tc, one of which is the Lag Method:

L l^.8 (S+1)^.7 Tc = --- where L = ----------------- .6 1900 Y^.5

1000 and S = -------- - 10 CN

TC=Time of concentration [hours] L=Lag time [hours] l=Hydraulic length of watershed [feet] Y=Average land slope [percent] S=Potential maximum retention [inches] CN=Weighed Curve Number

The unit hydrograph, when dimensioned, tells us what the runoff will be for a single burst of rainfall. To determine the runoff for the entire storm, we must perform a convolution of the unit hydrograph with the precipitation excess. This is simply a summation of many unit hydrographs, each of which represents one burst of runoff.

uh.gif

The process is as follows:

1) For the first burst (of duration D) we determine the precipitation excess and create a corresponding Unit Hydrograph.

2) For the next burst we determine the precipitation excess occurring during the interval D which is Q=Q(t+D)-Q(t). We create the corresponding UH, translate it by the duration D, and add it to the previous result.

3) Step 2 is repeated for all durations D needed to compose the entire 24-hour storm.

The resulting hydrograph represents the runoff from the entire storm. This is the fundamental method used by TR-20 for predicting runoff.

Note that if Tc=7.5 minutes, D=1 minute, and a 24-hour storm will consist of 1440 bursts generating an equal number of unit hydrographs. If the UH consists of 100 coordinates, about 140,000 coordinates must be summed to produce the composite hydrograph! Obviously, such a technique cannot be performed by hand.

If you can do my Hydrology homework, I'll eat my shoes.

The answer is 42.




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