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phoenizz

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3rd March 2008

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#1 15 years ago

just press control V and post. Holden, you do not have permission to access this page. This could be due to one of several reasons:

  1. Your user account may not have sufficient privileges to access this page. Are you trying to edit someone else's post, access administrative features or some other privileged system?
  2. If you are trying to post, the administrator may have disabled your account, or it may be awaiting activation.



=X= Sea

I'm too cool to Post

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6th April 2004

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#2 15 years ago

just press control V and post.




BK898

People say I post too much

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5th September 2004

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#3 15 years ago

nothing atm.........




phoenizz

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3rd March 2008

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939 Posts

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#4 15 years ago
Mac Daddy

\m/

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15th June 2004

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#5 15 years ago

"I don't want my son marrying that ugly bitch!!"




AegenemmnoN Advanced Member

The cream of the crop

228,590 XP

20th August 2003

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#6 15 years ago

nothing. i just got on my mom's computer.

hi Mac.




S3phiroth

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2nd June 2004

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#7 15 years ago
perry07

I'm too cool to Post

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15th February 2004

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#8 15 years ago

Doctor doctor! I'm in bed Achin' head Gold is lead Choke on bread Underfed Gold is lead Jesus bled Pain is red Are goon Grow go Greasy spoon You swoon June bloom

Music seems to help the pain Seems to cultivate the brain. Doctor kindly tell your wife that I'm alive - flowers thrive - realize - realize Realize.




Master of Reality

I'm lying when I say trust me

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8th June 2004

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#9 15 years ago

Harder, Harder!! Hmm....what was that from




SpiderGoat

Nel mezzo del cammin

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5th December 2003

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#10 15 years ago

Cultural Trauma and the "Timeless Burst": Pynchon's revision of Nostaligia in Vineland. By James Berger Department of English George Mason University [email]jberger@osf1.gmu.edu[/email] Postmodern Culture v.5 n.3 (May, 1995)[1] Nostalgia has a bad reputation. It is said to entail an addiction to falsified, idealized images of the past. Nostalgic yearning, as David Lowenthal writes, "is the search for a simple and stable past as a refuge from the turbulent and chaotic present" (21). The political uses of nostalgia are said to be inevitably reactionary, serving to link the images of an ideal past to new or recycled authoritarian structures. And it is true that nostalgia has played major roles in many of the reactionary and repressive political movements of this century -- in Nazism's reverence for the "Volk," in socialist kitsch, and, in the United States, in Reaganism's obsession with idealized depictions of family life in the 1950s. Most recently, nostalgia has been described as a masculine response to feminist threats to patriarchal privilege.[2] Nostalgia has certainly kept some bad company. And yet, it seems to me, the critiques of nostalgia have not addressed important questions concerning the mechanics of how the past is transmitted into the present and how it might best be used. Postmodern texts and readings, as Michael Berube has noted (with reference to Gravity's Rainbow), place great emphasis on problematics of "transmission and reinscription; not on overturning the hierarchy between canonical and apocryphal but on examining how the canonical and apocryphal can do various kinds of cultural work for variously positioned and constituted cultural groups" (229). In this essay, I will reevaluate nostalgia as a form of cultural transmission that can shift in its political and historical purposes, and thus bears a more complex and, potentially, more productive relation to the past than has generally been allowed in recent discussions. I will reconsider the possibilities of nostalgia through a discussion of Thomas Pynchon's 1990 novel, Vineland, a book whose low critical reputation parallels that of the term in question. In fact, Vineland has been criticized precisely for its nostalgia, for a politics that exhibits an overly comfortable longing for those good old days of the Movement and the attempt at revolution.[3] Indeed, Vineland seems, in its story's emphasis on repairing the broken family, to veer toward an almost Reaganesque nostalgia. The novel ends with a family reunion; its final word is "home." Vineland works its way, however, to a very troubled home, and its "sickness"[4] is not a conventional nostalgia for idealized sites of origin. Its concern, rather, as it returns to the 1960s from the vantage of the Reaganist 1980s, is with how cultural memory is transmitted, and it portrays the ideological distortions, marketing strategies, and the variety of nostalgias through which Americans in the 1980s apprehended the 60s. Central to Pynchon's conception of how the past inhabits the present is the notion of trauma. Vineland returns to the 1960s not as to a site of original wholeness and plenitude, but, rather, as to a site of catastrophe, betrayal, and cultural trauma. Moreover, the past in Vineland is not simply a place to which a nostalgic text may return. Rather, it is the traumatic past that persistently leaps forward into the present. And yet, as Pynchon presents it, along with the traumatic return of the past into the present (a return which is necessarily marked according to the prevailing Reaganist and consumerist ideologies) is another, utopian, element. The utopian, or revelatory, moment is simultaneous with the traumatic moment. And so, in effect, Pynchon's nostalgia is a nostalgia for the future, for possibilities of social harmony glimpsed at crucial moments in the past, but not ever yet realized. Pynchon's portrayal of this congruence or simultaneity of trauma and utopian possibility resembles Walter Benjamin's use of the term jetztzeit, the critical moment of historical, redemptive possibility which continues to erupt into the present even after many previous failures. Like Benjamin's use of jetztzeit, Vineland's nostalgia possesses an ethical and political urgency, an imperative to use its glimpse of utopian potential to try to change an unjust history. And, like the jetztzeit, Vineland's utopian/traumatic vision constitutes a kind of pivot or wedge by which a given historical record can be loosened, opened, made available to change. Where Pynchon's account of nostalgia chiefly differs from Benjamin's treatment of jetztzeit is in Pynchon's attention to the mechanics of how the traumatic/utopian cultural memory is transmitted. Through his pervasive use of popular culture imagery and tone, Pynchon emphasizes that historical trauma and the possibilities of working through the trauma do not, as would seem to be the case in Benjamin's "Theses," burst unmediated into the present. Rather, the insistent return to, and of, the past as a site both of catastrophe and of redemptive possibility will always take particular cultural and ideological forms. In Vineland, these will be the forms of American consumerism and Reaganism in the 1980s.[5]

I made it a bit shorter :). It's actually 17 pages...