Veterans return to El Alamein -1 reply

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BlackFeather

Not Rude Dude

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21st October 2002

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#1 15 years ago

El Alamein Veterans Reunite, 60 years later. on 10/20/02/ 01:46:18 Up to 150 war veterans returned to El Alamein yesterday to mark the 60th anniversary of one of the Second World War's most important battles, The Independant a newspaper/website in the United Kingdom has full coverage of the event and quotes from some of the soldiers who were actually at the battle.

quote: The Battle of El Alamein, a 13-day confrontation in October and November 1942, ended in a dramatic victory for Field Marshal Montgomery's Eighth Army, over Erwin Rommel, the "Desert Fox". I thought this little bit of news Info was interesting for all and those youngin's that are now understanding that all these wars actually took place. and not just a game.:)




Zotchman

I'm too cool to Post

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23rd October 2002

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#2 15 years ago

Let's not forget the real men who fought bravely and received the Medal of Honor. If you read some of these accounts, you get a feel for what bravery actually is.

From: http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/mohiib2.htm

JACOBSON, DOUGLAS THOMAS

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division. Place and date: Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 26 February 1945. Entered service at: New York. Born: 25 November 1925, Rochester, N.Y. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 3d Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division, in combat against enemy Japanese forces during the seizure of Iwo Jima in the Volcano Island, 26 February 1945. Promptly destroying a stubborn 20mm. antiaircraft gun and its crew after assuming the duties of a bazooka man who had been killed, Pfc. Jacobson waged a relentless battle as his unit fought desperately toward the summit of Hill 382 in an effort to penetrate the heart of Japanese cross-island defense. Employing his weapon with ready accuracy when his platoon was halted by overwhelming enemy fire on 26 February, he first destroyed 2 hostile machinegun positions, then attacked a large blockhouse, completely neutralizing the fortification before dispatching the 5-man crew of a second pillbox and exploding the installation with a terrific demolitions blast. Moving steadily forward, he wiped out an earth-covered rifle emplacement and, confronted by a cluster of similar emplacements which constituted the perimeter of enemy defenses in his assigned sector, fearlessly advanced, quickly reduced all 6 positions to a shambles, killed 10 of the enemy, and enabled our forces to occupy the strong point. Determined to widen the breach thus forced, he volunteered his services to an adjacent assault company, neutralized a pillbox holding up its advance, opened fire on a Japanese tank pouring a steady stream of bullets on 1 of our supporting tanks, and smashed the enemy tank's gun turret in a brief but furious action culminating in a single-handed assault against still another blockhouse and the subsequent neutralization of its firepower. By his dauntless skill and valor, Pfc. Jacobson destroyed a total of 16 enemy positions and annihilated approximately 75 Japanese, thereby contributing essentially to the success of his division's operations against this fanatically defended outpost of the Japanese Empire. His gallant conduct in the face of tremendous odds enhanced and sustained the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. ------------------------------------------------------------ Can you imagine the bravery?




Capt Burden THX113

I don't spend enough time here

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31st October 2002

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#3 15 years ago

Don't forget Zotchman, us British fought bravley too against the Hun in the darkest hours of the war. Dunkirk, SAS operatives, battle against Bismark. The list goes on. Not wishing to tar every american with the same brush, but the Americans do seem to forget we fought too ya know and had our major cities bombed. The mainland US was not attacked (Hawaii was obviously but thats why i said Mainland US) and perhaps that is why Sept 11 came as such a shock, you were attacked in th heart of your untouched homeland. Anyways i dont want to cause an argument about who won WW2. Bravery was shownnby all sides even the Germans and the Japanese , they fought for their countries in the same way as us Allies did and deserve to be thought of in the same respectful manner.

Capt. Burden THX1138




Asmodan

Slightly cooler than a n00b

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29th October 2002

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#4 15 years ago

I doubt anyone will forget Englands role in the war. The four most common names people think of when asked about WWII are Churchill, Hilter, MacAurthur, and Stalin.

I still find the loyalty and friendship the US and England share amazing. A mere two hundred years ago we were killing each other, which isn't too terribly long in the grand scheme of things.




Iniog

I want to be like Revenge

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6th September 2002

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#5 15 years ago

[Wanted to dig up the oldest post we got and this is a good one]

TURNER, DAY G.

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company B, 319th Infantry, 80th Infantry Division. Place and date: At Dahl, Luxembourg, 8 January 1945. Entered service at. Nescopek, Pa. Birth: Berwick, Pa. G.O. No.: 49, 28 June 1945. Citation: He commanded a 9-man squad with the mission of holding a critical flank position. When overwhelming numbers of the enemy attacked under cover of withering artillery, mortar, and rocket fire, he withdrew his squad into a nearby house, determined to defend it to the last man. The enemy attacked again and again and were repulsed with heavy losses. Supported by direct tank fire, they finally gained entrance, but the intrepid sergeant refused to surrender although 5 of his men were wounded and 1 was killed. He boldly flung a can of flaming oil at the first wave of attackers, dispersing them, and fought doggedly from room to room, closing with the enemy in fierce hand-to-hand encounters. He hurled handgrenade for handgrenade, bayoneted 2 fanatical Germans who rushed a doorway he was defending and fought on with the enemy's weapons when his own ammunition was expended. The savage fight raged for 4 hours, and finally, when only 3 men of the defending squad were left unwounded, the enemy surrendered. Twenty-five prisoners were taken, 11 enemy dead and a great number of wounded were counted. Sgt. Turner's valiant stand will live on as a constant inspiration to his comrades His heroic, inspiring leadership, his determination and courageous devotion to duty exemplify the highest tradition of the military service .

THIS GUY OWNZ

but to reply to the guy above england is now weaker the america and the best part about england is is that they aboey every1 thats stronger then them :)




meanperson

Slightly cooler than a n00b

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4th December 2002

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#6 15 years ago

as has been said, all sides showed extreme bravery and commitment during the war, and all have their own stories of spectacular human beings doing amazing things. like the german company that left for the front with 800 men. upon returning, the officer in charge was asked by his superiors where his men were. he said, "they are right outside," pointing out the window where 37 men were marching down the street. or the russian tank driver who, when his tank broke down, ran the 20 miles back to base, grabbed a few tools, ran back to his tank, fixed it, and was back the next day. or the japanese, who, even though they were outgunned and outnumbered (if the planes were made of paper, what do you think the chi-ha was made out of?), managed to inflict massive amounts of damage to the american forces in the pacific. think about it. what kind of person would it take to give their life just to inflict that extra little bit of damage to an enemy ship?